Neck Stretching

copyright Shelley SteinlePretend that you’re not a shy writer who

Relies on solitude and a radio station with a classical

Orchestra to hear your muse and to

Muse about your characters, like a lonely cat and an

Ordinary (talking) squirrel and a turtle named

copyright Shelley Steinle

Ted who scratches his head about the

Importance of getting yourself

Out of your shell, stretching your

Neck to proclaim loudly “Molly Finds Her Purr is for sale!”

 

promotion, children's booksAnd so you hand Molly postcards to the bank teller and the

Neighbor down the street who lives with a

Gray cat, and you agree to a TV interview

Sitting primly in front of a camera

Talking about your books and thinking “My neck hurts.”

P R O M O T I O N   A N G S

The Right Wrong Man

Twin Desires

Birds of Paradise

Molly Finds Her Purr

 

144 thoughts on “Neck Stretching

    • Before I started publishing, I couldn’t imagine doing something like this either. And in many ways, I still can’t! But… these days all authors (except maybe John Grisham and Stephen King and Ann Patchett) need to get out there themselves and sell their books! (And actually, even well-known authors do). Many thanks for watching my interview. You’re the best.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Pam, this was a wonderful interview. I very much enjoyed it. I pictured myself right there with you having the discussion. I agree with Jan. Forget the promotion angst and get yourself out there.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Haha, you noticed how Jan the interviewer kept on trying to encourage me to visit bookstores, book fairs, etc.? She’s a publicist – that’s her job. But I didn’t hire her. Instead, I girded my loins and put the interview here on my blog. 🙂 But I DID feel like I was talking to my friends, like you, and just having a neat conversation about our love of writing.

      Liked by 2 people

      • She was definitely encouraging you to get your books out there. I wasn’t sure what her role was when she was speaking about her people or her authors. I wondered if she might have been a publisher but didn’t think so. Publicist makes sense.
        The conversation was a delight. I feel I know you so much better now. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks for being patient, waiting for a copy of Molly. I’m guessing you ordered from Amazon, and for some reason Amazon has had a hard time getting its ‘act together’ in responding to orders (I don’t know if you had that problem with your memoir). I ordered some Molly books from Amazon for my mom’s friends, and they are finally on their way. Breathe in. Breathe out. I’m not as brave as you – doing that magnificent book tour that you did – but I like that now you ‘hear’ my voice even thought we haven’t met (YET).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, I’m humble alright. When I began this process of being a published writer (back in 2014) I never guessed I’d get to the point of being interviewed about my muse and my passion. But hey, since it’s our passion, I told the interviewer “Ask away!” 🙂 Thanks for watching, my friend. BTW, I just recommended you to an author/friend who is looking for an editor/proofreader. Hope you hear from her.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Kudos Pam. From the comments it seems you’ve done a great job of promoting yourself and sharing your heartfelt stories. Congrats on the interview and multiple books published and ready to be promoted. You can do it (in your own way and time)!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m delighted, Esther. So glad you find Molly and her story charming. She’s purring with pleasure. If you have the inclination and time, please feel free to add a one or two sentence review on Molly Finds Her Purr’s Amazon page. Each review helps an author so much. xo

      Like

  3. Pam, I love your voice, so nice to hear all about your books and how they were edited, even by your grand daughter! When we write, we don’t think of money… that is so cute!
    Wishing you great success with your new book. ‘As lovely as Lie’ is a beautiful title!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Your comments are warming my heart, Balroop. It’s so true, isn’t it, that we don’t write or publish thinking we’re going to “make money.” Ha. We would be disillusioned quite quickly. We write for the pleasure and passion and belief in our words and characters and stories (and in your case – in your poetic honesty about life).
      I’m so glad you like the title of my WIP. Similes are such a great way of describing “life” and the dichotomy of it all. I hope this title exemplifies that, and will make readers curious about the love…and the lie.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I’ve known your for years and it’s fun to hear your voice in this fun interview! Promotion is tough, but you’d never be able to tell it by the interview! You sound very comfortable. And I like your related poem today — very clever.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Isn’t it fun how we’ve “known each other for years” but never heard each other’s voices? So glad you enjoyed the interview – and my voice. I liked the interviewer’s questions, which helped me feel comfortable as I talked about my books. Many many thanks for your encouragement (and your wonderful review of Birds of Paradise). If you write reviews on Amazon, Bert and Bessie would be quite appreciative of one. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Wow – thank you for the encouragement and support. I wasn’t sure what the interview would be like nor what the questions would be. Thank goodness I ate my spinach the night before (that’s an old Popeye joke – not sure where that came from). 🙂 Many, many thanks. xo

      Like

  5. Wonderful video chat and interview, Pam! 🙂 It’s amazing how much we have in common as writers. I started my own publishing company this year to launch my poetry and photography collection, My Maine. As an independent author, I’ve experienced the ups and downs of being an Amazon author. Now I’m stepping out and trying to reach independent book stores and libraries across The Pine Tree State. Gave my first presentation “Celebrating Maine through Poetry” last week and my confidence is growing. You’ve inspired me to go for it! Thoroughly your interview and learned a lot. 🙂 Thanks! xo

    Liked by 1 person

    • YOU inspire ME, Bette. That is wonderful that you’re reaching independent stores and libraries. Molly’s independent publisher (Borgo Publishing) sent a “TIP sheet” (with all the particulars of my new book with pricing, page numbers, photo, etc.) to my local libraries and bookstores, but not sure they responded at all. I think you’re right, as independent authors we need to hoof ourselves to these places and introduce ourselves face-to-face. Daunting! Congrats on your presentation! Yes – GO FOR IT.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I have a similar take as many others do—you seem totally at ease, confident, and poised in this setting. As someone who used to be pretty shy, I think the moments when we get out of our comfort zone that end up building the most confidence. As as elementary teacher, I believe 100% in the power of public speaking. It empowers us and makes us feel good about ourselves. Well done, Pam.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You make some excellent points here, Pete. First, all students, starting at a young age, should be encouraged to learn/participate in public speaking. We use those skills our entire life. I am an introvert, for sure, but I remember as a child watching my dad practice his speeches (for work) at our home in front of the dining room table (where he pretended a large group had gathered). I hid under the table and learned some great tips – be natural, don’t get intimidated, and talk happily about your passions.
      Many thanks for your kudos – they mean a lot.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Pam, first a wonderfully inventive post … it’s tough putting oneself out there but wow! You’ve even done a TV interview! It’s been a delight to see and listen to you talk about your writing, books and promotion – you seem very confident, calm and friendly! A gem of a guest and friend!

    Hope you neck stops hurting … and all this becomes part of the norm of life!
    ps. I like the idea of postcards and this is something I’ve been mulling over. You’ve sold me on the idea!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The postcards for Molly Finds Her Purr made a big difference, Annika. My (independent) publisher designed these for me and I had 150 of them printed. I sent out 70 to my “nearest and dearest” friends and many, many responded by pre-ordering. What a delightful surprise! So yes, I encourage you to do this for your next book. Or for your current book of short stories. I now give them out even to strangers – look how brazen I’ve become. ;-0
      Thanks for the sweet compliment – I wasn’t sure if I’d share this video, but then I figured – what the heck, we need to share who we are as well as what we are (as writers) with our blogging friends. ❤

      Like

    • You are amazing, to watch my video. I figured it would be too long for most to even start, but wow, we writers/bloggers are so wonderful to each other, and spur us on. I truly believe that for a picture book, the author and illustrator need to be “in sync” with each other, and I’m not talking about deadlines, but about the underlining values and “heart” of what a story is all about. Most publishers do not let the author choose her/his illustrator – that is chosen for them, and it’s another reason why I’m grateful I was able to use a wonderful Independent Publisher for MOLLY FINDS HER PURR.
      And pods? I love writing my pods – and am using them for my next WIP. ❤

      Like

  8. Nice to see you in the flesh talking about your books. I know our friends’ little girls in India and Spain are going to be over the moon to read about Molly finding her purr. It’s very interesting how you are “bilingual”, able to speak to an adult audience and children as well.

    Peta

    Liked by 1 person

    • You are such an amazing supporter (of me and other authors) and believer in sharing the joy of reading to others. India! Spain! I’m beyond thrilled that my young (and not as young) readers are spread throughout the world. Many many thanks to you and Ben. ❤

      Like

  9. I saw your comment above about Ann Patchett, and yes, even Ann travels to promote her books. She is here in Los Angeles in just a few days speaking at a local bookstore. So promotion is necessary even for the very well-known. Your interview was wonderful and I admire your ability to write and publish, but promotion has to be the most difficult aspect and you get a round of applause for doing that well! 🙂 Congratulations!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, THANK you, Debra. I just finished reading Ann Patchett’s newest and wonderful THE DUTCH HOUSE, so she was on my mind. The nice thing for well-known authors is that their publicist sets up their interviews/book signings. We “little authors” need to do that ourselves, and I’m way too shy for that. I’ll never forget driving into Harvard Square a few years ago at a well-known bookstore to listen to Elizabeth Berg (another one of my favorite authors) talk about her book while also book signing. There were only SIX of us there in attendance. How humiliating and difficult for her.. And she’d flown in from Chicago. I think it was at that point where I decided my little ole writing room was my safe space. 🙂

      Like

  10. I loved watching this interview… loved hearing your voice. I am a collector of children’s books because the child in me loves the illustrations and of course the stories. I enjoy stories of animals. Molly Finds Her Purr is a must for me.I do follow your blog but it was good that you mentioned the Friday Flash Fiction because somehow I missed that. Congratulations! I’m heading to Amazon for Molly Finds Her Purr and Birds of Paradise!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve collected illustrated children’s book for years also, so I have a great pile that I show off in my guest room. And those that are holiday-themed come out at the appropriate time. Illustrators are unsung artists many times. I hope you’re able to add Birds of Paradise (Bert and Bessie) and Molly Finds Her Purr (Molly, Petey and the rest of the gang) to your collection. ❤

      Like

  11. A wonderful and enjoyable interview, Pam, and so nice to hear your voice. I like the part about being a pantser too. I think I’m something of a hybrid because I usually have the beginning and end figured out before I start writing, and rely on the characters to tell me how to fill in the rest. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’d like to be a plotting pantzer, Jennifer. Definitely helps knowing the beginning and the ending. But so far, I’m led on by my characters as if on a leash. Even in this children’s book, Molly Finds Her Purr, when I began to write about Molly I had NO IDEA how the heck she’d find that purr. ;-0
      P.S. I’m halfway through Calmer Secrets. Really enjoying – and your cover is perfect!

      Liked by 1 person

      • That has happened to me too, Pam, with certain characters. It’s almost magical the way it happens. Another thing that happens to me often: waking up in the morning and realizing a plot hole or discrepancy that needs fixing. Or an idea pops in my head how to make the story better. It’s as if my subconscious brain works it out while \i sleep 🙂
        Thank you so much for reading my books! The covers were done by the same artist, but where I self-published the second, I had more say in its design. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much for listening to my interview. The bad news/good news is that (bad) I had no idea what the interviewer would be asking me, but (good) she asked me questions about writing and I could talk about that all afternoon long. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • I’ll tell you, I thought the interview would be an ordeal, but instead, I sailed through it happily, since the interviewer asked me about my favorite subjects (writing and books). Thank you for your wonderful response. I’m puffing up a bit now. Actually, I was feeling some post-partum blues after publishing MOLLY, but with the amazing support here on the blog, I’m gathering up courage for the next book.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. A very nice interview, Pamela with you appearing to be very much at ease. This gave your readers/followers a chance to learn a little bit about you and your writing career and how you formulate a story line. I really had no idea that you are still teaching classes. It is good to know that you are sharing your writing talents with others.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. You are a pro in front of the camera, Pam! I saved your video to watch whenever I had a moment and just did. Very nice interview and promotion opportunity. And, I feel like I just know you a little bit better now. I had no idea you lived in Marin County before. Gorgeous areas. Congrats again with the release of Molly Finds Her Purr!!

    Liked by 1 person

Always a pleasure to read your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s