Embarrassing!

Embarrassed, memoirWhen was the last time you were embarrassed?

Embarrassment is defined as mild to severe levels of discomfort, usually experienced when someone commits a socially unacceptable or frowned-upon act.

The older I get, the less embarrassed I am. Hey, take me as I am, or don’t take me at all. But one of the stories in my just-published “flash memoir,” Flashes of Life: True Tales of the Extraordinary in the Ordinary, includes a tale entitled “How to Embarrass Your Kids.” Readers have told me they relate to my (tee hee) gleeful moments of embarrassing my progeny. Not in a mean way, but ….
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I’m Late to My Party

eyes, late, PixabayAre you an introvert or an extrovert or in between? In the “old days,” being an introvert meant you were shy and socially awkward.  Most people who know me would say “Pam? No way.”

A psychology professor at Pepperdine University, Cindy Miller-Perrin, explains that “Shyness reflects an anxiety or discomfort associated with social situations, but introversion is really just a preference.”

Exactly. I prefer to be by myself for large stretches of time. I’m a writer, after all. But I also love meeting friends for lunch or a long walk.
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No Regrets

ocean, lifeguard, lifeguard stand, seashoreSightseers into Pilgrims, by Evangeline Paterson 

I used to think --
loving life so greatly --
that to die would be
like leaving a party
before the end.
Now I know that the party
is really happening
somewhere else;
that the light and the music --
escaping in snatches
to make the pulse beat
and the tempo quicken --
come from a long way
away.

And I know too
that when I get there
the music will never
end.

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Buckled Love

Cheerios, cereal, blueberryCereal and blueberries. That’s what I should have for breakfast this morning. But as I stare at the quart of blueberries sitting in my refrigerator’s fruit drawer, I change my mind.

Two months ago my mom died. Yet, it seems like she’s still alive, and like she left years ago. In fact, I wasn’t able to mourn her for the six years she suffered from dementia, but since she’s died, I’ve celebrated her vitality and misdeeds and shenanigans and mostly, her love for her family, in big and small ways. Continue reading