Ruptured and Repaired

rupture, appendicitis, health care workersI spent five days in the hospital this week – not as a patient, but as a visitor, an observer, a worried spouse, and a woman who had preconceptions blown over by kindness, intelligence, and wonder.

But first with the worry.

I rushed my guy to the ER Friday afternoon after insisting on taking his temperature. Why oh why do men like to “play it cool” even when in obvious discomfort? I suppose the answer to that goes back millennium, maybe to the first cavemen.

Whatever, after pushing the thermometer in his mouth rather forcefully, we discovered his temp was high. Really high. Per his doctor’s instructions, I drove him to the ER, and that’s when the story begins.

The nurses and doctors poked and prodded, all kinds of medical tests occurred from 5 p.m. to midnight, consultations transpired between radiologists to internist to GI specialists to neurologists to …. Well, you get the picture. During this time each nurse/doctor/technician treated my guy like he was their friend. Like they cared.

 KINDNESS

Making sure of the diagnosis before treatment, the GI surgeon finally did his part at 9 the next morning – laparoscopic appendectomy. An hour later the surgeon called and talked to me for over 15 minutes about the result. He immediately relaxed me (“my team is pleased with the surgical success”) but also then explained the entire procedure and the not so-good-news – perforated appendix and resultant infection.appendix, GI, health care workers, Pixabay

So, then on to the infectious disease specialists, who tested the bacteria in my guy’s blood to find the right antibiotic that would kill the “bad bugs” (my guy’s terminology) and fight the infection.  

INTELLIGENCE

Many tests. Days in the hospital until they got it right. My guy’s mood was brightened by morning sunshine, nurses and PCAs who smiled and brought him a cup of coffee before breakfast and laughed at his puns (right there –  reason to applaud nurses forever), and treated him like a man, not a number or a “subject.”

I was lucky enough to be able to visit my guy in his room, and staff answered my questions gracefully – the many years of education these nurses and doctors have gone through; the loans they’re saddled with (several nurses live at home with their parents so they can pay off their loans), their struggle with Covid (in the Spring, the surgical unit was all Covid patients, and several of the nurses were infected and isolated at their homes for weeks).

Not one patronizing specialist in the group  – and for those who read my fictional story last week, no Juliana either (Know Thyself ). Also, over half the medical specialists who treated my guy were women.

Most of them must live with strong-willed people, I decided, because as my guy entreated them to “let me go home,” they just smiled and said, “when it’s time.”

I think medical professionals have figured out how to smile with their eyes so patients can feel assured, despite masks and tons of sanitizer squirts every few minutes.

My WONDER?

How we read and hear so much bad news about health care, about disease and pain, but little about the small stuff – the real picture of day-to-day care from professionals who not only do their jobs, but go beyond treatment and into the realm of empathetic healing.

So yes, our lives were ruptured a bit with the medical emergency, but our well-being was repaired beyond measure.

175 thoughts on “Ruptured and Repaired

  1. In the UK we are so lucky with the NHS, I hear moans about not having television, or the food is not as good at home, they did not come quick enough when the buzzer was pressed. My sis lives in Georgia USA, and frankly she would not care about those things; just as long as our health system was their’s. I hope his recovery is swift and successful.

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  2. It is wonderful, Pam, to hear how. Frightening event turned out to become
    a sunshine story. Such treatment is healing in itself.
    It would be a wonder if it was the case always. Have a wonderful time re-living your experience together.

    Miriam

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    • According to my guy, he’s glad there is only one appendix per person and he doesn’t have to lose another one. ☺️ Any kind of surgery or hospitalization is an ordeal, but in our case the care and the healthcare workers made it all a happy ending. 💖

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    • On one hand I wished they would’ve done the surgery immediately to alleviate the pain. On the other hand, I’m glad the doctors took their time to make sure of the diagnosis before using a scalpel! 😄 You are so right, kindness and expertise combined helped us get through this.

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  3. What a frightening ordeal, Pam. Good thing you crammed that thermometer into his mouth! I’m so happy he’s okay and experienced great care at the hospital. Yes, typically we only here the bad when it comes to our healthcare system. Sharing your experience is a wonderful tribute to the dedication practiced by our medical professionals. Take care both of you! xo

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    • Being in pain and hospitalized is such a scary experience that many people are just so glad to get out of there that they don’t think about the time and effort the healthcare team take to make sure that the patient CAN get out of there! 😬😉

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    • Cheers indeed❣️ Once the surgery was accomplished, then the bacteria had to be contained and killed. It took a village of hospital personnel to help us get through this. I cannot say enough good things about their skill and kindness combined. 🙏

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  4. Pam, here’s wishing a speedy recovery for your man. I loved the ‘pun’ line. ❤ Yes, the care, devotion and dedication of those who care for others are uplifting. Thank goodness for your thermometer intervention and I feel men are taught not to show vulnerability. Much love to you all, always. ❤ Xxx

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    • I’m so glad that medical personnel are finally getting recognition from all of us who depend on their expertise and compassion. If I could, I’d send each of them a bouquet of daisies and a batch of my homemade cookies. ☺️❤️

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  5. I’m glad it all went well. I had my appendix out many decades ago but I vividly remember the pain of the attack. My husband is a minimizer. When he goes to the doc, he always says he’s ok, nothing’s a big deal and no one should worry. He had an incident 3 years ago and it changed him. He passed out and collapsed. I thought he had a stroke. Ambulance ride, many tests and a short hospital stay later, there was no conclusive answer but the best guess was a sudden blood pressure drop. He had another one early this year. I’ve been pleased that he has curtailed some activities like biking and long drives by himself. Still, when he goes to the doc for an important appointment, I go along because he still minimizes whatever is going on and it’s hard to treat that. He also had some really great medical professionals.

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    • No one wants to go to a hospital, and these days people avoid a hospital like the plague. Oh, speaking of plague,… but in our case after lots of sanitizer and questions about fevers and colds and being around anyone else who had Covid, we were allowed in the ER face masked along with everyone else and actually felt safe. I have never seen a hospital or any facility look so gleaming clean. 👍👏

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  6. This is a beautiful and heartwarming story Pam, all the better because it’s true. I’m grateful you and your husband have come through this with hope and kindness from our medical system. My family and I have had rather poor experiences. I’ll take yours as a ray of hope.

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  7. I don’t think this is flash fiction. You and your guy really did survive a scary ordeal. I love the line, . . . “each nurse/doctor/technician treated my guy like he was their friend. Like they cared.”

    I don’t know if you watch HGTV, but the couple, Erin and Ben, on Home Town wrote a memoir in which Erin describes how her appendix ruptured over and over, but for whatever reason was not detected. No more spoilers, but I’m so glad your doctors zeroed in on the problem right away. 🙂

    KINDNESS is the key to story, and I’m sure you did your part by not coming into the hospital petulant and perverse. Your guy is funny and punny. You both are SO fortunate. Here’s to a complete recovery! And a relaxing Labor Day weekend! oxo

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    • Interesting, Marian. No I don’t watch HGTV. I can’t imagine an appendix bursting over and over again. One burst in my guy’s case was once enough for sure. 🙃 A quote comes to mind and I’m using it totally wrong but something like “kindness is as kindness does.” I’m trying to say here ithat we treated the healthcare workers as real people with their own concerns and issues and they in turn treated us (my guy) as a man, not as a burst appendix. I’m a firm believer in the importance of friends and family and even more especially strangers looking into the heart and soul of each other and acknowledging the importance of each other’s lives. I know that you know exactly what I mean. 🙏❤️

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  8. While I’m sorry about any medical emergency I am thrilled to read about good docs and nurses. It’s encouraging to know that there are efficient and empathetic people who helped you, and others, get from a place of pain + fear to health + hope. Good news, under the circumstances. Stay healthy!

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    • Thanks and YES – my guess is that the majority of health care workers have a nurturing spirit, which is what sent them to med/nursing school in the first place. But I know they have to deal with overstaffing and at times, too many patients, as when the Covid surge happens. In our case, we had teams of doctors/nurses who watched over my guy and made sure he had the best care. It was heart (and body) warming. We are so thankful!!

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  9. Oh my gosh, Pam! i am so sorry you–and your precious guy–had to go through this! But thank goodness you got him to the ER and they discovered what was causing the high fever and he was able to have surgery in time. Your beautiful tribute to the medical staff is just that. Beautiful. When Barry had his knee surgeries in 2012 we thought the same thing. The doctors and nurses and other personnel were caring loving compassionate beings. We walked away from his two surgeries in love with all of them! Hope your guy continues to recuperate and heals completely in record time. xoxo

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    • I’m glad you and Barry had the same experience as we did, Kathy. I know that in our country we rant about our health care (and granted, health care costs are through the roof and broken in many places). But the people who actually DO THE WORK and the CARE – they are the health care workers who take our lives in their hands in so many ways, and caringly take care of our bodily discomfort/diseases. These are special, special human beings. ❤

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  10. Oh my goodness I am sorry to hear about that disruptive appendix! As a retired nurse after 35 years, your experience warms my heart. You are so right that often we hear the negative things about health care. Thank you for sharing all the good that came out of a scary situation. I can not imagine the stress health care workers are under in this time of COVID. Bravo to each one I say.
    Very best wishes to your pun loving husband. Hoping for a smooth recovery going forward.

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    • No wonder I always feel a calming/caring presence from you, even though through your traveling blog posts, Sue. You nurses are A M A Z I N G people who make a huge difference in the lives of those struggling with disease and bodily strife. I cannot tell you how many nurses came into my guy’s room with a cheery disposition (even when poking more needles and taking more blood – haha) and made sure he was as comfortable as possible. Not only that, we had some great conversations with a few who felt at ease enough to talk about the stress during these times. I applaud their empathy, strength, expertise and talent every day.

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    • As we all struggle with different problems during this pandemic time, I think it’s beyond important to also focus on the bright side of what we humans do for each other. And the health care profession is right there on the top of my list. ❤

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  11. I love that photo of the two of you. You look so at ease and joyful.

    What a scary bout you had. Is he home now and feeling better? It’s so refreshing to learn that the staff were kind and empathetic. I didn’t experience the same in 2015 when my guy had an accident and was bed and wheelchair bound for 5 months. Sounds like you had a very good hospital and that your guy is on the mend. Thank goodness. 🙏💗

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    • Fortunately my guy is home and I’m “Nurse Pam.” Also fortunately the hospital where my guy had his surgery and infection recovery is known for its patient care. But most importantly, I realize it’s not the “hospital” that gets high marks for the care/kindness/medical help — it’s the health care professionals!
      So scary for your guy to have such a long recovery from an accident. Yikes. Just five days in a hospital was enough for my guy to whisper gratefulness to be home several times a day. ;-0

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  12. Oh my, Pam! What a week you and your guy have had! I’m so glad he’s on the mend now. And it’s good you got to be with him. It’s wonderful that the all the staff members were so caring, friendly, and knowledgeable, and that they treated your guy with compassion and laughed at his jokes. 😀 I have enormous respect for health care workers–it’s not a job I could not do.
    I was not always so pleased with the care my mom received when she was in hospitals, but I think that’s the unfortunate reality of understaffed big city hospitals and elderly patients who are not always given first priority.
    In any case, virtual, physically distant hugs for you and your guy!

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    • Back when my kids were almost out of the house (high school) my close friend and I decided we needed new careers, and that we should become nurses (at the time, I was a medical editor). We perused all of the courses we’d have to study, and followed a nurse for one day, and decided we would NEVER succeed in this most difficult career. ;-0
      I understand what you’re talking about at your mom’s facility. I experienced the same with my mom’s, but as you mention, the nursing homes and memory care facilities were/are so understaffed AND underpaid it’s a disgrace. This is a place that health care has done a great disservice to medical professionals as well as to its patients. But that’s another topic I suppose for another day.
      In our case here, we were so impressed with the amazing care/kindness/expertise by all of the medical personnel who helped my guy. In fact, they are the reason he is home and recovering.
      Well, that and my chocolate chip cookies. 🙂 🙂

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      • I don’t have the temperament for the work AND I can’t imagine doing the coursework either. I’m so bad with numbers. 😀 Yes, you’re so right about the different types of facilities–and add mental health, too–and veterans. . . Sigh.
        But I am SOOO happy that your guy is doing well, and I’m certain the chocolate chip cookies are of great value in his recovery. 😀❤️

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  13. I could see all the stress and anguish that is hiding behind your positive narrative Pam, as I’ve experienced such situations. Moments lengthen and nothing sounds to matter except the wellbeing of the guy we think is the strongest. I am glad you met all those lovely persons who smile despite the hard work they have to put in. Wishing your guy a speedy recovery.

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    • As an intuitive, Balroop, you are exactly right. I was stressed to the max and worried and perhaps not even trusting that the doctors/nurses could do what was needed to help my guy survive. But during all this time, they reassured me with smiles and detailed explanations of what was going on. They treated us as intelligent clients who deserved to know the details, and we both really appreciated that. It’s amazing how healing a smile, kindness, and compassion can be.

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  14. I’m so glad all turned out well, Pam. And yes, wouldn’t it be nice if our cavemen tried to be less “manly?” Lol. I love how you come out of this experience with an eye on the kindness and compassion that’s all around you. You can turn even these distressing experiences into an opportunity to appreciate and celebrate the goodness in the world. Your guy is a lucky man. I’m relieved to hear that all has turned out well. Thanks for sharing the news and for taking the time to honor our amazing healthcare workers. They’re heroes. ❤ ❤

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    • Thank you, Diana. Originally I wasn’t going to write about our medical emergency (after all, it just happened this week!) but I think too often the hard work and amazing care of health care professionals are not acknowledged. So many in our country are upset with our health care system (for good reason) but the “foot soldiers” – the men and women who actually do the medical work – they ARE heroes in my mind.

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      • I’m glad you did, Pam. I agree. Our news often shares the stories of healthcare workers, many who are losing their lives to covid or just weeping with sadness and stress. Half of the US doesn’t wear masks… as if they don’t matter. Every shout-out is important.

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  15. Sorry for your guy’s suffering, but very glad to hear that he’s better and back home. I like that you point out how so many of these people are struggling financially, paying off loans, living with parents still, etc. It’s a crime that we don’t do more for those who work on the front lines. I hope that’s addressed someday in the not-too distant future. – Marty

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    • I hope so too, Marty. With this current pandemic crisis, I think people in general are beginning to have more respect and enlightenment regarding the skills/empathy within the health care community.. No doubt our heath care is broken, but not the workers who do the real CARING. They should be rewarded financially, not the administrators or insurance companies. ;-0 I’m usually not political in my blog posts, but I’m responding to your great comment. THANK you.

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    • I think whenever a loved one gets sick, it’s an ordeal for everyone involved. I think I’m just as tired as my guy, who is recovering, albeit slowly. Many thanks for your comment and for reading my post. ❤

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  16. It sounds like last week was pretty harrowing for you and your guy. I’m so glad to hear that he’s on the mend and something tells me that the care you provide at home will be every bit as vital and compassionate as the care he got in the hospital. Very nice to hear that you had such a positive experience with the health care workers in your area. They are truly heroes and life would be quite different without their selflessness and strength.

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    • Your words ring so true, Amy. I truly do not believe my guy would be alive if not for the swift, knowledgeable and kind care by the nurses and doctors in the hospital.
      Hope you’re enjoying the beautiful weekend weather in your seaside community – we are relaxing on the porch, taking in Nature and healing in many ways. ❤

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  17. I’m so glad to hear he is okay and wow that must have been hard to get him to go… Thank you for bringing the heart into what could have been a nightmare. SO grateful for you and your words at this time in our lives…

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    • Awww, thank you Shannon. I won’t lie, it was a scary experience. But thanks to these amazing health care workers, he made it out with one less appendix, but still basically intact!!! ❤ Me? I'm still traumatized. Haha. Life is NEVER boring….

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  18. What a story! Thank goodness everything turned out well and Jerry had great care! In the age of doctor video visits and time consuming referrals, it’s nice to hear about positive outcomes and excellent care, even though it was a scary ordeal. You’re a beautiful couple, continue with healthy years ahead and many great adventures!
    Love you!
    Sandi Z

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    • I could not agree with you more, Janis. I’ve gotten to know some doctors on a first-name basis, and they are so discouraged about our health care system; several of them have pondered leaving the health care field! What a loss that would be. I hope we can find a way to change the system, but show our appreciation and respect for the doctors/nurses/PCA’s who help the sick and broken every day.

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  19. I´m so glad your guy is OK and was well looked after. Any experience we have had with health care professionals has always been very positive. They are angels in disguise as far as I’m concerned. Big hugs to both of you.xo

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    • Glad to hear you have had good experiences also with health care professionals. I don’t think they get the respect and admiration they deserve many times. My guy certainly would not have made it through this crisis without their skills and kindness!

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  20. Pam so glad to hear your guy is ok and on the mend. And also really good to read about what a positive experience it all was..After I had surgery in 2005 for breast cancer, I came to the conclusion that really the nurses are the backbone of any hospital. I saw the surgeon once in four days after surgery, the nurses are there every day, every hour, doing all the work and being underpaid.

    Hope your life gets back to normal soon. Those hospital scares are stressful and tiring. Thankfully this emergency has a happy outcome.

    Peta

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    • You are SO RIGHT, Peta. The nurses are the backbone – the spine and heart – of health care. Hard workers who take care of the bodily needs of patients in gentle and understanding ways. May our society find a better way to respect and reward these professionals.

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  21. I am so happy about the level of care your guy received and that the outcome was excellent. Appendicitis is so very hard to detect. My daughter had hers out at 5 and her dad thought she was just putting on an act. Fortunately, we got her to the hospital before it burst. The entire staff were all kind as well. I could tell you stories about getting men to the doctor that would make your hair curl. At least I raised a son not so stubborn about it. Now you get to take a deep breath and relax a while.

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    • “ I could tell you stories about getting men to the doctor that would make your hair curl.“ oh my gosh Marlene, this made me smile. I suppose this is the reason the book – Men are from Mars Women are from Venus -did so well in its day. 🤔 Glad you raised a son who knows how to listen to his body! Thanks so much for being here. xo

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  22. Am so glad you and your guy are both well—I think most men (and I’m thinking my Hubby) always seem to pooh-pooh any alarms over health. So glad you got him to the hospital and under such super care!
    Your guy deserves another “Hug” and am sure you gave him plenty! 🙂

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  23. Whew. I’m glad for the happy ending, and as one who knows the hospital circuit well with her own hub, I commend the amazing frontline people. I do have to ask though, was the infection causes by your heroic man enduring the pain too long before going to hospital? It’s also a man syndrome. 🙂 xx

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  24. Yes, we men tend to think we can tough most situations out. Thank goodness you were persistent enough to get his temperature.

    My beef isn’t with the medical professionals. Most of my experiences with doctors and nurses have been great. Insurance companies are the big bad wolves of the industry in my eyes. Prescriptions, even with insurance, can be outrageous. My other complaint with them is that there is so much gray area about how things get billed.

    I’m glad your hubby is doing better, and also because most medical professionals do a phenomenal job is a stressful situation.

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    • You say it well, Pete. It’s the insurance companies/medical admin who hike up the fees so regular folk like us are plowed under. I’ve heard many docs and nurses decry the costs. And sometimes patients blame them (the medical staff) for the costs, which isn’t fair.
      We are holding our breath for the hospital bill to come. But at this point, I’m just so glad we dodged a bullet and my guy is alive and healing. ❤

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  25. Hi, Pam – This is so beautifully written. You have given us a great reminder of the hardworking and caring teams of people out there who selflessly make a true difference to our health and safety. I am so glad that your guy is doing well and is now on the mend.

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  26. So glad you got him into the hospital in time. I hope he’s recovering nicely. We had a similar experience, my husband was out plowing snow right before I took him in for his appendix to be removed. We were lucky with our experince at the hospital too. Thanks for sharing. Sending lots of healing hugs.

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    • Oh my gosh – PLOWING SNOW?! I wonder if you had to take him kicking and screaming to the hospital too. ;-0 Well, by then, neither of our guys had the energy for kicking or screaming, but glad we both got them to the hospital in time…!

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  27. So sorry your husband had to go through this painful experience, but it was lovely to hear how well he was treated and that everything was dealt with in exactly the right way. This story started out on a down note, for sure, but ended up on such a positive and lovely high one. Thanks for sharing, Pam! May we all be so lucky when faced with illness or injury. (My experiences with doctors and hospitals has almost always been a good one, too, and hopefully will continue that way, when needed in the future.)

    Best wishes for hubby’s continued smooth recovery and no more scary incidents lurking ahead! 🙂 ❤

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  28. So glad your story has a happy ending, Pam. Everyone in my family has experienced an ER visit and it’s not fun, the waiting and more waiting for test results. But, we’ve always had great care at Kaiser, and now as we get older, we’ll probably never leave its comfort zone. We’d like to retire somewhere else, but now we think of Kaiser when deciding where. I guess that’s a sign of getting older, thinking of healthcare. It’s wonderful that you were able to visit your guy in these Covid times. Who can imagine what the healthcare workers have gone through? Take care both of you and cute pic at the end. 💓

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    • Many of my friends in Marin go to Kaiser and have praised the care of docs/nurses/medical team there. I think you’re in a great place, near great medical care. However, thinking of you during this scary stressful fire season. Hope you all are okay. I know the air/sky is especially strange today.

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      • Today was so surreal and we’ve never seen anything like it in the 21 years we’ve lived here. It really does feel like the end of the world. 😦 I just keep praying for all those who are in the heart of these horrible fires and crazy weather. Thanks, and stay safe, too. 💓

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    • I’m shivering at the thought of going through a burst appendix in another country. Beyond scary for sure. Did he recover quickly? Did he have a blood infection? Oh my, Jacqui. I want to know that your story came out okay too. xo

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  29. I am so glad your guy is on the mend and doing better. What an ordeal and how scary it must have been for you. Especially after you just lost your mother. When my guy was in the hospital last year I was amazed by the care and the kindness he received from the medical profession. I can’t say the same thing from the several different emergency rooms we had to visit.

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    • ERs are a bit of a different experience, I’ll admit that, Gerlinde. The patient and his/her family are so scared as the docs/medical team try to figure out what’s going on. Not a place I’d like to visit any time soon, or if possible, ever again. ;-0 I’m so glad to hear your guy had great medical care last year, also, and it seems like a happy ending. ❤

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  30. Thanks so much for sharing this story! We hear so much of the negative these days that it’s easy to begin to think that no one really cares anymore. I’m so sorry your husband had to go to the hospital, but I’m glad that he was treated so well there. We all need reminders of how good most people still are, and I think that medical personnel especially deserve a shout out now!

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    • Which is why I wrote this post, Ann. I wasn’t going to share the whole “burst appendix emergency scare,” but I decided I really wanted to give a shout out to these amazing medical professionals who help others with care and compassion day in and day out. ❤

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  31. Sooooo happy your guy is going to be ok. I’m also sorry for the worry and stress of it all. That would be a hard situation to endure under “normal” circumstances let alone during a pandemic.
    We have had 2 friends in the hospital this week unrelated to COVID. Both are recovering and will be ok. But the prayers were never ceasing for them and another who buried his dad on Thurs. I will add your guy to my list! 😘
    Stay safe and well my friend! ❤

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    • THANK YOU for adding my guy to your prayer list. He’s on several, and I think it helps a lot. I believe in the power of a Spirit who is connected to us all, and who answers our earnest and honest thoughts. I’m glad your friends are recovering. We were so relieved that I could be with my guy every day in the hospital despite the pandemic – careful steps were taken to keep everyone safe. ❤

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    • Traumatic is a great word for what we went through, Robbie, and you know that precisely because of what your brother-in-law went through. Soooo scary, and yet with great medical help, both men are alive and doing well. Thank goodness!!! ❤

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  32. Such a scary, yet heart-warning story, Pam. I hope your guy is recovering nicely! I used to say it would be awful to have an emergency during Covid, but this pandemic is lasting so long and many emergencies have ended well.

    We have to move on with life – the good and the bad – through these unsettling times. I really appreciate and enjoyed the way your focus is in this post. Positive and appreciative – a good karma kind of focus and feelings. It helps! 🙂

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    • I am a firm believer in positive energy/positive thoughts/and daily (even hourly) gratitude, Liesbet. Attitude makes a huge difference in outcomes. From the get-go, my guy and I were so appreciative of the help, concern, and kindness we received at the ER and then hospital, even when it was at its scariest. Personally, I think that helped us all (me, my guy, the medical team) get through this emergency happily “on the other side” of what could have been disaster. Namaste and happy karma to you!

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  33. What an alarming experience for both of you, Pam! I’m so relieved that your guy is on the mend and that he was in such good hands, from you being wise enough to take his temperature, to the compassionate doctors and nurses and the blessings of medical technology. We never know what kind of treatment we will get when we’re in such a vulnerable state, but thankfully, more often than not, kindness, intellignce and wonder come through. Healing blessings to both of you!

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    • “More often than not” is the truth, Barbara. And expecting a great outcome helps too. We cannot say enough about the way the medical team handled my guy’s crisis. It’s why his recovery is going so well. xo

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  34. Pam, so happy things worked out for you all. I have usually had positive experiences with medical professionals, and I know so many personally in the field that it’s hard for me to make snap judgments about them. I had to smile at your rhetorical question regarding men and how they play it cool when they’re not feeling well. Not in my house! Both Hubs and Teen Son moan and groan with the slightest discomfort. 🙂 Anything to be waited on, is my guess, lol. Happy Labor Day!

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  35. Whenever I hear ‘ruptured appendix’, my gut clenches and my mind immediately starts to relive the worst 3 weeks of my life when it happened to son #1 many years ago now. Yes, the male of our species likes to downplay even crippling pain until it is almost too late 😏
    Like your’s, my story also eventually had a happy ending … and I too couldn’t sing the praises of the medical staff loud enough for their sensitivity in handling our son – and us!

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Sorry to hear the news about your “guy,” Pam. Thank you for the warning that the bad news wasn’t on you. Guys are tougher, but with the rupture of appendix, even a tough guy is helpless. Good to know the doctor found the right kind of antibiotics for the infection.

    Hubby had back pain for years but only walked with a stiff back without complaint. By the time he decided to have a back surgery, the procedure cost half a million dollars. Why do guys hide their pains?

    Wishing your hubby a speedy recovery. I hope you can relax by now.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. So glad your guy had a good outcome…and that you were allowed to go see him during these trying times. Yes, those Docs and Nurses are special people. They need to know how much they are appreciated STAY HEALTHY! Sasha

    ________________________________

    Liked by 1 person

  38. Wow, Pam, a high temperature is very scary. “Like they cared.” ❤️ Appendectomy is scary (I am using scary a lot here, since that is how I would feel) and then infection is an extra challenge. You remind me how we truly do not know the extent of care and kindness in the medical profession until we are in serious situations. I am very glad your story has a happy ending. I see many more puns in your husband’s future.🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  39. I am so glad your guy did well, and so glad team took care of you and him, in every way. My husband and I are both retired RNs. We still think of our patients and wonder how they are today. We rejoiced, worried, struggled and mourned along with our patients and their families. I hope some one who cares will be able to be there for me when my time comes. I have had so many patients hold my hand and call me Mama. I thought maybe they were seeing Mama. I never corrected them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Can you tell I hit the “LIKE” button ten times? 🙂 It’s for people like you and your husband that I wrote this post. I hope you take every word I wrote here to heart, because medical professionals like you two are what makes this world right. THANK YOU!!!!

      Like

      • This is such a coincidence. My son’s appendix ruptured two days ago. The staff has been wonderful. We were privileged to be able to stay with him. I suspect there is a link to his earlier COVID infection. Did your guy have COVID? Fortunately, my son is fine.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Oh my gosh – and I don’t believe in “coincidences.” it was meant to be that you read my post. No, my guy did not have Covid before (nor when he was tested at the hospital). I’m so glad you were able to stay with your son and I’m thrilled that he is okay. I wonder if he’s also on antibiotics now like my guy. They seem to be what slows down the “feeling good’ process, but such a necessity. We are so thankful for these meds! Sending you and your son/family hugs.

          Like

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